Digital Safety and Responsibility Education

The school continues its efforts to educate our students about digital safety and responsibility. On June 10, we will host “The White Hatter” presentation for all students. This is an Internet/Social Media and Digital Literacy Education presentation for teens by Personal Protection Systems Inc. For more information, please visit; http://www.personalprotectionsystems.ca/programs/internet-safety/internet-safety-schools.html

 

We would like to share a resource with parents to help you teach your children about these issues as well. A copy of “Parenting Tweens and Teens in the Digital World” from the Canadian Centre for Child Protection will be sent home this Wednesday with each Grade 7 and 8 student. If you didn’t receive the educational booklet for parents and wish to have a copy, please pick one up at the office. More information can be found at protectchildren.ca

My Strength Is Not For Hurting – Daniel Vecchio Student Presentations

Daniel Vecchio will be in School District 60 during the week of May 16th.  He will present to our Grade 8 and 9 students on May 18th.  Daniel’s presentation raises awareness of the issues related to abuse and violence towards women.  Please contact the school should you have any questions.

Daniel will also offer a parent presentation from 7:00 to 8:30 pm in the Band room on May 18th.   The band room is located at the south exit of the school.

Daniel Vecchio – Saving our Boys (Parent Presentation)

Saving our Boys- our duty of care

Parent Presentation – Bert Bowes Band Room (south side of school)

May 18th from 7:00 to 8:30 pm

How nurturing our boys’ emotional health, especially in the classroom, must be foundational for all teachers and parents.

In this workshop, teachers and parents will learn how fundamentally important it is to engage and nurture the boys in our schools to find their emotional voice (emotional literacy.) The research is abundant about what happens to far too many boys who are emotionally illiterate (just look at the stats around violent crime, sexual crime and harassment, incarcerations, boy suicide, substance abuse, drop-out rates, and achievement in school)- the data is very disturbing; clearly we need to re-think how we “behave with and react to” boys during their school experiences. Far too many boys believe that the only acceptable emotions for them in our society are anger and aggression; far too often these boys grow up to be men who are angry and aggressive. Our boys carry with them the invisible code of “manhood” and it is an impossible for any of them to live up to this cultural creation of a masculinity that still values and encourages boys to use power, strength, domination and control over others; a culture that does not nurture boys to express a broad array of healthy emotions so that they can live full and happy lives.

Participants will have the opportunity to learn how and why boys are getting a “raw deal” in schools and what they can do in their school communities and with the partnership of parents, to raise emotionally healthy boys who grow into healthy men.

Alaska Highway News Story on The Phantom Toolbooth Jr. Musical

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Bert Bowes Middle School students performed The Phantom Tollbooth Jr. for students from across the district on Thursday.   Photo By Bronwyn Scott

Bert Bowes Middle School students are gearing up for their public performance of The Phantom Tollbooth Jr.on Friday night at the North Peace Cultural Centre.

The 1961 adventure novel by Norton Juster is a “super fun” story about a boy who is bored of everything in his life, and something magical happens to give him a fresh perspective on life, according to Irene Hayward, the play’s director.

“His room is transformed, he gets a car, and tollbooth that take him through some magical lands,” she explained.

“He goes to a land of numbers, and a land of letters. He goes on all sorts of different adventures. He has to save princesses and fight off demons, and he learns a very important lesson: that ‘what you can do is often simply a matter of what you will do,’ so if you’re willing try, you can do amazing things, is the moral of our story.”

The Grade 7, 8, 9 and 10 students – there are a few high school kids helping out – overcame their nerves and jitters by performing for students from across the region on Thursday.

“That moment of going on stage for the first time and having about 200 people from their own school watching them is probably the hardest thing they go through,” Hayward said.

Grade 9 student Jordan Bourgeois plays the lead character Milo.

“I’m 10, pretty much nothing is exciting, nothing interests me until this phantom tollbooth takes me on an adventure to teach me that everything has meaning,” she said in interview with the Alaska Highwa News.

“Then I learn that everything is cool.”

It’s her first lead role, and so far she’s loved the experience of practicing and rehearsing with her peers.

“It’s been so much fun, after a while we all become like a little family,” she said.

Grade 7 student Morgan Wigglesworth, who plays a handful of roles, including a vendor, and an advisor to the king, has also enjoyed every aspect of practicing for their big show.

“You do get pretty nervous before a show … but it is really fun to be in musical theatre,” he said. “I just love the whole thing.”

The Phantom Tollbooth Jr. takes the stage at the North Peace Cultural Centre Friday night at 7:30 p.m.

Tickets are available at the North Peace Cultural Centre.

peacereporter@ahnfsj.ca


© Copyright 2016 Alaska Highway News

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